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Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

Commander of NAVSEA visits MOC AOG

by U.S. Navy Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Devin S. Randol
04 March 2021 Vice Adm. William J. Galinis, commander, Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), visited the Maintenance Operations Center (MOC) Aircraft on Ground (AOG) and attended a teleconference at Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic (CNAL), March 3, to meet with leaders and key specialists regarding the Navy's advancing ambitions on operational readiness for its aircraft.
 
While at the conference, Galinis was impressed by the working synergy each individual had with one another, and how the MOC AOG enables such productive communication. The team collaborated together and offered up solutions and dialogue for matters such as part ordering and flight scheduling.

Vice Adm. William Galinis, commander, Naval Sea Systems Command, receives a brief
210303-N-CJ362-1033 NORFOLK, Va. (March 3, 2021) – Vice Adm. William Galinis, commander, Naval Sea Systems Command, receives a brief on super hornet readiness in the Maintenance Operation Center (MOC) Aircraft-on-Ground (AOG) Cell at Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic. The MOC/AOG was the largest driver in Navy surpassing its goal of achieving 341 mission-capable strike fighter aircraft. Naval Aviation is now expanding the MOC/AOG to include additional airframes. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sam Jenkins) (This photo has been digitally altered for security purposes by blurring out identification badges.)
Vice Adm. William Galinis, commander, Naval Sea Systems Command, receives a brief
210303-N-CJ362-1033
210303-N-CJ362-1033 NORFOLK, Va. (March 3, 2021) – Vice Adm. William Galinis, commander, Naval Sea Systems Command, receives a brief on super hornet readiness in the Maintenance Operation Center (MOC) Aircraft-on-Ground (AOG) Cell at Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic. The MOC/AOG was the largest driver in Navy surpassing its goal of achieving 341 mission-capable strike fighter aircraft. Naval Aviation is now expanding the MOC/AOG to include additional airframes. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sam Jenkins) (This photo has been digitally altered for security purposes by blurring out identification badges.)
Photo By: MC3 Sam Jenkins
VIRIN: 210303-N-CJ362-1033

 
“This is a well-oiled machine, quite frankly,” said Galinis. “This kind of information flow doesn't happen overnight; you all have been working hard at this and it clearly shows.” 
 
The teleconference, led primarily by CNAL's Civilian Deputy Director, Dave Ferreria, cemented the MOC AOG's positive reputation in Galinis' eyes. Galinis continues to be optimistic in the Navy's ability to rise above manning and operational challenges.
 
“The MOC is making a difference in the fleet,” Galinis said. “In the meetings I've been in with Navy leadership, they've been singing the kudos of this operation quite often. Good work, thank you, and keep pressing!"
 
The MOC AOG is a collective which includes Navy supply, maintenance, and engineering specialists, as well as private industry contractors partnering with the Navy. Together, they’ve been working to assess, improve, and properly organize the efforts to keep mission-capable aircraft fully ready to fly wherever the Navy needs them.
 
 
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